Drunk Driver Pulled Over by 36 foot Motorhome

While the country discusses the troubling militarization of its police forces, drunk drivers in Washington should perhaps be worried about the recreational-ization of its State Patrol after a 28-year-old man was arrested by a lieutenant behind the wheel of a 36-foot motorhome Aug. 9.

According to the Washington State Patrol, the lieutenant was driving the department’s Mobile Impaired Driving Unit back to its Bellevue District office around 3 a.m. when he spotted an erratic driver on 156th Street near I-90.

The Mobile Impaired Driving Unit is a 36-foot motorhome that has been turned into a mobile DUI processing center and command post. It is also equipped with emergency lights.

As there were no other units in the area, the lieutenant pulled over the 2001 Honda Accord and arrested the driver for investigation of DUI. It probably looked like a rhinoceros catching a hamster.

If you lose your privilege to drive because of a DUI incident in Washington State, you should not only check with DOL as to when you will be eligible to lawfully drive again, but you should also immediately contact a Seattle DUI attorney. A DUI attorney is not going to judge you, and understands that everyone makes mistakes. Hiring a Seattle DUI attorney to help can – at a minimum – reduce DUI penalties, and can help direct people on how to best deal with their DUI charge. Driving Under the Influence charges can cause havoc on a person’s personal and professional life. Anyone charged with DUI in Washington State should immediately seek the assistance of a seasoned Seattle DUI lawyer.

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NFL Looking at New Marijuana Policies

Marijuana is casting an ever-thickening haze across NFL locker rooms, and it’s not simply because more players are using it.

As attitudes toward the drug soften, and science slowly teases out marijuana’s possible benefits for concussions and other injuries, the NFL is reaching a critical point in navigating its tenuous relationship with what is recognized as the analgesic of choice for many of its players.

One challenge the NFL faces is how to bring marijuana into the game as a pain reliever without condoning its use as a recreational drug. And facing a lawsuit filed on behalf of hundreds of former players complaining about the effects of prescription painkillers they say were pushed on them by team trainers and doctors, the NFL is looking for other ways to help players deal with the pain from a violent game.

A Gallup poll last year found 58 percent of Americans believe marijuana should be legalized. That’s already happened in Colorado and Washington – the states that are home of last season’s Super Bowl teams.

The World Anti-Doping Agency has said it does not need to catch out-of-competition marijuana users. And at least one high-profile coach, Pete Carroll of the champion Seahawks, publicly said he’d like to see the NFL study whether marijuana can help players.

There are no hard numbers on how many NFL players are using marijuana, but anecdotal evidence, including the arrest or league discipline of no fewer than a dozen players for pot over the past 18 months, suggests use is becoming more common.

The NFL is fighting lawsuits on two fronts – concussions and painkillers – both of which, some argue, could be positively influenced if marijuana were better tolerated by the league.

The science, however, is slow-moving and expensive and might not ever be conclusive, says behavioral psychologist Ryan Vandrey, who studies marijuana use at John Hopkins. Marijuana may work better for some people, while narcotics and other painkillers might be better for others.

The Washington Redskins, who are part of the concussion lawsuit, is working with a bio-pharmaceutical and phyto-medical company called KannaLife Sciences that recently received licensing from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a drug to treat concussions using derivatives from medical marijuana.

Co-founder Thoma Kikis, who has been working on cannibas-based solutions to concussions for a few years, said he approached the NFL about signing on to the research.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has treaded gingerly around the subject. Before last season’s Super Bowl he said the league would “follow the medicine” and not rule out allowing players to use marijuana for medical purposes. An NFL spokesman reiterated that this month, saying if medical advisers inform the league it should consider modifying the policy, it would explore possible changes.

A spokesman for the players union declined comment on marijuana, beyond saying the union is always looking for ways to improve the drug-testing policy. But earlier this year, NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith said the marijuana policy is secondary when set against the failure to bring Human Growth Hormone testing into the game. Some believe relaxing the marijuana rules could be linked to a deal that would bring in HGH testing.

The NFL drug policy has come under even more scrutiny this summer, after the NFL handed down a season-long suspension of Browns receiver Josh Gordon for multiple violations of the NFL substance-abuse policy. That suspension, especially when juxtaposed against the two-game ban Ray Rice received for domestic violence, has led some to say the league’s priorities are out of whack.

In June, Harvard Medical School professor emeritus Lester Grinspoon, one of the forefathers of marijuana research, published an open letter to Goodell, urging him to drop urine testing for weed altogether and, more importantly, fund a crash research project for a marijuana-based drug that can alleviate the consequences of concussions.

The league does, in fact, fund sports-health research at the NIH, to the tune of a $30 million donation it made in 2012. But the science moves slowly no matter where it’s conducted and, as Vandrey says, “the NFL is in business for playing football, not doing scientific research.”

Meanwhile, marijuana becomes more and more acceptable across America every day. But even with the Super Bowl being dubbed “The Stoner Bowl” and the issue hanging heavily over the NFL’s marquee event, the league has shown no signs of quick movement.

The league’s threshold for a positive test remains 10 times lower than that of WADA, which changed its limit last year in a nod to the reality that the drug is not a performance enhancer.

The NFL’s conundrum is figuring a graceful way to keep tabs on those who use marijuana recklessly – or recreationally – while giving others a legitimate form of pain relief.

If you or a loved one is in a bind as a result of a DUI, immediately contact a Seattle DUI attorney. A DUI lawyer is not going to judge you, and understands that everyone makes mistakes. Hiring a Seattle DUI lawyer to help can – at a minimum – reduce those penalties, and can help direct people on how to best deal with their DUI charge. So it should go without saying that someone cited for DUI should hire a qualified Seattle DUI lawyer as soon as possible. Driving Under the Influence charges can cause havoc on a person’s personal and professional life. Anyone charged with DUI in Washington State should immediately seek the assistance of a seasoned Seattle DUI lawyer.

Marijuana Sales Reach $3.8 million in First Month

During the first month of legal marijuana sales in Washington state, stores sold just under $3.8 million, which is expected to bring in more than $1 million in state taxes, the state reported on Friday.

Although licenses have been issued for about 40 stores, only 18 were selling pot in July, and 16 of them have reported sales so far in August.

During the first month of retail marijuana sales in Colorado, the state collected closer to $2 million in excise and sales taxes.

Like Colorado, Washington will tax marijuana in two ways: sales taxes and excise taxes.

Excise taxes are paid at three different points in the process: When the grower transfers the marijuana to the processor, when the processor transfers it to the store and when the retailer sells it to the consumer. The tax rate at all three points is 25 percent.

The Legislature is not banking on any marijuana revenue until the next fiscal year begins in July 2015. They have forecast tax collections totaling $122 million in the next two-year state budget cycle.

The state of Colorado has collected $29.8 million in all marijuana taxes, fees and licenses since recreational sales became legal in January. That number includes medical marijuana taxes.

About $24.7 million worth of recreational pot was sold in June in Colorado, the state reported Friday. Colorado’s July tax collections have not yet been reported.

If you or a loved one is in a bind as a result of a DUI, immediately contact a Seattle DUI attorney. A DUI lawyer is not going to judge you, and understands that everyone makes mistakes. Hiring a Seattle DUI lawyer to help can – at a minimum – reduce those penalties, and can help direct people on how to best deal with their DUI charge. So it should go without saying that someone cited for DUI should hire a qualified Seattle DUI lawyer as soon as possible. Driving Under the Influence charges can cause havoc on a person’s personal and professional life. Anyone charged with DUI in Washington State should immediately seek the assistance of a seasoned Seattle DUI lawyer.

Former King County Sherrif’s Deputy Pleads Guilty

A veteran King County Sheriff’s deputy who helped his wife start a prostitution business, stole ammunition from the sheriff’s office and dabbled in a number of illegal drugs pleaded guilty to three felony charges Monday as part of a deal with prosecutors.

A judge then sentenced Darrion Holiwell to one year plus one day in jail, calling him a disgrace to his profession.

Holiwell, a 49-year-old Seattle man, was charged with promoting prostitution, theft, and drug dealing.

Holiwell’s transgressions first came to light during divorce proceedings with his third wife, Alicia Holiwell. According to the charging documents, Alicia had been physically abused by Holiwell, though she did not report the incidents, and she contacted his previous wife, Dana Smith, to see if there was a pattern. Smith was reportedly so overwhelmed by what Alicia told her, she contacted a friend who works for the sheriff’s office. That friend notified her supervisor, and an investigation began.

Holiwell and Alicia separated in May 2013 — supposedly temporarily to work on their marriage — and Alicia got her own condo. According to the charging documents, she started her escort business shortly after.

Alicia told detectives Holiwell provided her advice on how to run the business, and in the beginning she would text him her clients’ IDs and inform him when she was with a client as a security measure.

Once the business got going, Alicia was making $2,000 a weekend, and Holiwell would collect approximately 80 percent of the profits, according to the charging documents.

During this time, Holiwell reportedly supplied Alicia with human growth hormone to lose weight and marijuana and “molly,” a form of Ecstasy, to help with her escort appointments.

According to the charging documents, this arrangement ended when Holiwell started dating Alicia’s 20-year-old friend, violating the terms of their open relationship. Alicia got angry and filed for divorce.

Following the interviews with Alicia, detectives served search warrants at Holiwell’s home and the Sheriff’s Office firing range.

According to the charging documents, those search warrants turned up evidence that Holiwell had been taking both live and spent ammunition from the firing range without approval.

He reportedly gave some of the ammunition to a longtime friend who was providing him with drugs, as well as advice on the escort business. Other ammunition he traded in for credit at gun shops around the region, using it to by supplies for both his SWAT team and himself, according to the charging documents.

All told, Holiwell reportedly stole $15,000 worth of live ammunition and another 19,000 pounds of spent ammunition.

In addition, detectives turned up a number of illegal drugs, including steroids, at Holiwell’s home, according to the charging documents.

Holiwell has been with the Sheriff’s Office since 1995 and was a member of the department’s SWAT unit and its chief firearms instructor until his arrest.

If you or a loved one is in a bind as a result of a crime, immediately contact a Seattle Criminal attorney. A criminal lawyer is not going to judge you, and understands that everyone makes mistakes. Hiring a Seattle Criminal lawyer to help can – at a minimum – reduce those penalties, and can help direct people on how to best deal with their criminal charge. So it should go without saying that someone cited for a crime should hire a qualified Seattle Criminal lawyer as soon as possible. Anyone charged with a crime in Washington State should immediately seek the assistance of a seasoned Seattle criminal lawyer.